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Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.91

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 181. Rontgen, the father of diagnostic radiology/X-rays There are many technical terms related to the field of radiation, such as Becquerel, Sievert, and X-ray (In Japanese, X-rays are called Roentgens). Many of these words are derived from the names of scientists who made significant contributions to radiation-related research. For example, in 1895, Wilhelm Rontgen, a German physicist, conducted an experiment to evaluate a quality of an electric current passing inside an evacuated glass tube. This experimental device became a prototype for a cathode-ray tube built in an old TV. During this experiment, Rontgen noticed that a

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.90

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 179. Units of measure and elements are often named after physicists There are many types of technical terms in the field of radiation, such as Becquerel, Sievert, and X-ray (In Japanese, X-rays are called Roentgens). Many of these words are derived from the names of scientists who made significant contributions to radiation-related research. The Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radioactivity, which is the ability of radioactive substances to emit radiation. Simply put, it represents the number of radioactive substances. Therefore, Becquerels are used with regard to an object that exhibits radioactivity, such as food or soil. In 18

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.89

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 177. A different classification method for wastes with radioactive contamination after the Fukushima Disaster Radioactive wastes produced by nuclear facilities are classified into two categories: “high-level radioactive wastes,” which are the liquid form of radioactive residue produced in the reprocessing of radioactive fuels, and the rest of the radioactive wastes are collectively called “low-level radioactive wastes.” The previous article explained that radioactive wastes are handled differently. For example, the waste is stored in a shallow underground hole and packed in drums after being concentrated and solidified with c

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.88

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 175. Issues surrounding management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes Radioactive wastes produced by nuclear facilities are classified into two categories: high-level radioactive wastes and low-level radioactive wastes. A high-level radioactive waste is the liquid form of radioactive residue produced in the reprocessing of uranium and plutonium in spent nuclear fuel. This type of radioactive waste is solidified by mixing it with the melted glass; it is then transported and managed in a special container. The management of high-level radioactive wastes has been a common problem for all countries operating nuclear po

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