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Evidence-based policy as a political ideal

Authors: Jesper Ahlin Marceta This post was originally published by Transforming Society on 11 May 2020, and then it was reproduced in the Evidence & Policy blog. We have re-issued the article that has already been published by the Evidence & Policy blog. We would like to express gratitude to the kind offer of the editorial board of the Evidence & Policy blog. You can read the original research in Evidence & Policy [Open Access]: Ahlin Marceta, J. (2020) The evidence-based policy movement and political idealism, Evidence & Policy, DOI: 10.1332/174426420X15825349438945. (Image credit: GoodIdeas on Shutterstock) This post was originally published by Transforming Society on 11 May 2020, and t

Lessons for public health decision making in urgent and uncertain times

Authors: The ECDC Public Health Emergency Team: Suk, J.E., Salajan, A., Tsolova, S., Ciotti, M., Penttinen, P., Noori, T., Nerlander, L., Robesyn, E., Beauté, J., Cenciarelli, O., Melidou, A., Gosner, C., Adlhoch, C., van der Werf, M., Kramarz, P. This post was originally published by Transforming Society on 24 April 2020, and then it was reproduced in the Evidence & Policy blog. We have re-issued the article that has already been published by the Evidence & Policy blog. We would like to express gratitude to the kind offer of the editorial board of the Evidence & Policy blog. You can read the original research in Evidence & Policy [Open Access]: Salajan, A. Tsolova, S. Ciotti, M. and Suk,

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.100

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 199. Cancer risk can be inherited. According to recent statistics , around one in every two people in Japan will develop cancer in their life. Thus, cancer has become a common disease that anyone can develop. Various causes of cancer exist, including eating habits, heavy drinking, smoking, infectious diseases, and radiation exposure. In addition to these causative lifestyle and environmental factors, cancer can also be inherited. Obviously, hereditary cancer does not mean that cancer cells are inherited, it means that children inherent an increased cancer risk from their parents. Thus, cancer risks differ among individuals. F

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.99

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 197. An elevated risk of cancer could run in the family According to recent statistics, in Japan, around one in every two people will develop cancer in his or her lifetime. Furthermore, cancer deaths account for one in every five deaths in the country. Cancer is one of the common diseases in the country. There are various causes of cancer, including eating habits, heavy drinking and smoking, infectious diseases, and radiation exposure. In addition to these causative factors that are closely related to our lives and to the environment, it is known that cancer can be inherited as well. Needless to say, hereditary cancer does no

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.98

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 195. The quantity and quality of risk factors determine their impact on health It has been argued that a high-dose radiation exposure significantly contributes to cancer development. To understand the nature of cancer, this paper briefly introduces its history. In 1915, Dr. Katsusaburo Yamagoku, a Japanese pathologist, demonstrated the carcinogenesis of chemical substances by applying coal tar on rabbits' ears to induce cancer for the first time in history. Later, it was revealed that various types of chemical substances could cause cancer. Specifically, the researches on chemical substances familiar in our daily lives, such

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.97

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 193. Chemical substances induce cancer It has been assumed that high-dose radiation exposure significantly contributes to cancer development. To understand the nature of cancer, I would like to introduce the history of cancer in this article. In the late 18th century, a high incidence of scrotal cancer was reported among chimney sweepers in London. This turned out to be caused by soot exposure. It was 100 years later, along with advancements in chemical manufacturing, that various types of occupational cancers were reported among factory workers and coal miners. Most of them had skin cancer caused by occupational exposure to

Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.96

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D., Yuki Senoo 191. With the prolongation of life expectancy, cancer becomes a major public health issue It has been argued that high-dose radiation exposure can lead to increased numbers of cancer patients. In order to comprehend this issue more thoroughly, I would like to take a quick look at the history of cancer. The earliest record of cancer was described in an ancient Egyptian text. However, cancer was not a major public health issue for a long period of history, as the life expectancy of people used to be around 30 to 40 years. Instead, deaths caused by natural disasters, famines, malnutrition, infectious diseases, tribal struggles a

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