Dr. Tsubokura's Radiation Lecture Vol.138

Author: Masaharu Tsubokura PhD.

Editors: Akihiko Ozaki M.D.,PhD., Yuki Senoo


275. Keep in touch and socialize through the Internet and telephone

The outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is has spread rapidly all over the world. Many people may feel overwhelmed by constant COVID-19 news.


Now, we are in Golden Week (a cluster of national holidays that take place within one week from the end of April to the beginning of May each year in Japan). To avoid spreading COVID-19, each of us needs to avoid unnecessary traveling, socializing, and being in crowded places with poor ventilation; we must keep our distance from others.


On the other hand, it is crucial not to develop other diseases while preventing COVID-19. For example, social isolation and the decline of outdoor activities could increase the risk of disorders requiring nursing care, such as depression and fall-related injuries, particularly among the elderly.


Of course, the challenges posed by the current COVID-19 situation require strict control and prevention measures. However, the Basic Policies for Novel Coronavirus Disease Control designated by the Japanese government do not prohibit anyone from going outside for walks or outdoor exercise, which are necessary to maintain our health. I would like to underline that we are not restricted from stepping outside at all.


Today, we have many ways to keep in touch with other people, such as through the Internet, making phone calls, and writing letters. The COVID-19 pandemic could be a good opportunity to learn how to use new tools to communicate with others.



276. Strolling, housework, and physical activity

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is still growing exponentially all over the world. To avoid spreading COVID-19, each of us needs to avoid unnecessary traveling, socializing, and being in crowded places with poor ventilation; we must keep our distance from others.


On the other hand, spending less time outdoors and more time at home leads to a lower level of physical activity. Furthermore, a lack of exercise and increased muscle weakness can contribute to several physical health issues.


It is well known that regular exercise is vital for good health. For elderly people, weight training and jogging tend to be considered physical exercise, but exercise also includes taking a stroll or doing housework such as cleaning, laundry, washing dishes, simple stretching, and gardening.


As for the optimal level of physical exercise, 40 min/day of physical activity of any kind is recommended for the elderly, and an hour/day of walking is recommended for all adults. Of course, while this guideline provides a good starting point, it is only intended as a rough standard. The ideal degree of physical activity depends on an individuals’ health and whether he/she has a chronic illness.


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The Japanese version of the manuscript was originally published in Fukushima Minyu, a local newspaper in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, 26th April and 3rd May, 2020 was reproduced for MRIC Global under the author's permission.

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